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SPLASH 2019
Sun 20 - Fri 25 October 2019 Athens, Greece

The LIVE’19 workshop invites submissions of ideas for improving the immediacy, usability, and learnability of programming. Live programming gives the programmer immediate feedback on the behavior of a program as it is edited, replacing the edit-compile-debug cycle with a fluid programming experience. The best-known example of live programming is the spreadsheet, but there are many others.

The study of live programming is now an established area of research. This year we would like to reflect on achievements to date, lessons learnt, and the most promising directions for the future, as we grow up from a nascent community into a discipline that can build on previous work. We especially welcome reflection upon prior work, including proposals to integrate, generalize, or theoretically frame them. We will do this whilst maintaining the shared spirit of LIVE, encouraging a focus on the human experience of programming.

The LIVE workshop is a forum for early-stage work to receive constructive criticism. We accept short papers, web essays with embedded videos, and demo videos.

Tue 22 Oct

live
09:00 - 10:30: LIVE 2019 - Opening keynote at Room 2A
live09:00 - 10:00
Talk
live10:00 - 10:30
Talk
splash-2019-catering
10:30 - 11:00: Catering - Coffee break at Break area
live
11:00 - 12:30: LIVE 2019 - Session 2 at Room 2A
live11:00 - 11:30
Talk
Corey MontellaLehigh University
live11:30 - 12:00
Talk
Ikuta TanigawaKyushu University, Harumi WatanabeTokai University, Nobuhiro OheTokai Univ., Mikiko SatoTokai University, Nobuhiko OguraTokyo City University, Takeshi Ohkawa Tokai Univ., Kenji HisazumiKyushu University, Akira FukudaKyushu University
live12:00 - 12:30
Talk
Tom BeckmannHasso Plattner Institute, Christian FlachHasso Plattner Institute, University of Potsdam, Germany, Eva KrebsHasso Plattner Institute, Stefan RamsonHasso Plattner Institute, Germany, Patrick ReinHasso Plattner Institute, Germany, Robert HirschfeldHasso-Plattner-Institut (HPI), Germany
splash-2019-catering
12:30 - 14:00: Catering - Lunch at Restaurant
live
14:00 - 15:30: LIVE 2019 - Session 3 at Room 2A
live14:00 - 14:30
Talk
live14:30 - 15:00
Talk
Taku TadaYokohama National University, Yuka AkinobuJapan Women’s University, Makoto SakaneJapan Women’s University, Kimio KuramitsuJapan Women’s University
live15:00 - 15:30
Talk
Tomas PetricekUniversity of Kent
splash-2019-catering
15:30 - 16:00: Catering - Coffee break at Break area
live
16:00 - 17:30: LIVE 2019 - Closing keynote at Room 2A
live16:00 - 17:00
Talk
James NobleVictoria University of Wellington

Call for Demos, Essays and Papers

The LIVE’19 workshop invites submissions of ideas for improving the immediacy, usability, and learnability of programming. Live programming gives the programmer immediate feedback on the behavior of a program as it is edited, replacing the edit-compile-debug cycle with a fluid programming experience. The best-known example of live programming is the spreadsheet, but there are many others.

The study of live programming is now an established area of research. This year we would like to reflect on achievements to date, lessons learnt, and the most promising directions for the future.

The shared spirit of LIVE is a focus on the human experience of programming, and an interest in reconsidering traditional practices and beliefs. Topics of interest include:

  • Live programming environments
  • Visual/projectional programming environments
  • Advances in REPLs/notebooks/playgrounds
  • Programming by example/demonstration
  • Advanced debugging and execution visualization techniques
  • Language learning environments
  • Language design for learnability and teachability
  • Alternative language semantics/paradigms in support of the above
  • Frameworks for characterizing technical or experiential properties of live programming

Our goal is to provide a forum where early-stage work receives constructive criticism. We accept short papers, web essays with embedded videos, and demo videos. A written 250 word abstract is required for all submissions. Videos should be up to 20 minutes long and papers should be up to 6 pages long. We strongly recommend that your submission use concrete examples to explain your ideas. Please ensure that you contextualise your contribution by explaining how it differs from what has been done before.

There are no formal proceedings. Submissions are due Friday August 2nd, and notifications will be sent by Friday, August 30th.